Drones could form key part of next generation of UK search and rescue

Drones could form key part of next generation of UK search and rescue

From accidents off the rugged cliffs of the Atlantic coast to casualties in the high waves of the North Sea, drones could be used in the future to help save lives across the UK

A new project will investigate if drones could also boost missions by visiting rescue sites ahead of air, sea or land based recovery teams; by providing a full picture of the situation and helping to develop the appropriate response.

Announced Wednesday 5 February by the Maritime & Coastguard Agency (MCA), the project will explore how current regulation can be developed to unlock the potential for drones to help those in distress on the UK’s coastline, making rescues safer and more efficient.

Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani said: “Drone technology has enormous potential for our search and rescue teams, who save lives 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

“This ground-breaking project will not only hope to boost the capabilities of our already fantastic teams but will also boost our ability to spot pollution hazards and protect our precious marine environment.”

Last year alone, the MCA’s civilian search and rescue helicopters responded to seven missions a day on average, saving more than 1,600 people. In total, the MCA coordinated over 22,000 incidents and rescued over 7,000 people.

Phil Hanson, aviation technical assurance manager at the Maritime & Coastguard Agency, said: “I am extremely proud and excited that the MCA has taken the brave step to take the lead in the development and implementation of beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) drones in UK airspace.

“The use of drones in search and rescue, counter pollution and maritime aerial observation operations will potentially increase overall efficiency and also reduce the risk to our personnel – allowing the MCA to discharge its international obligations effectively.”

Source: Maritime and Coastguard Agency

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Falling Debris prompts push for drone inspections.

Fatal falling debris accident prompts push for drone inspections

By Amy Yensi

Just days after Erica Tishman, a renowned architect, was killed by falling debris in midtown, some city officials are proposing a new law they say will help prevent similar accidents.

It would require the department of buildings to conduct a drone inspection within 48 hours of a complaint or violation.

“This is not a toy, but it’s a tool. These tools will save millions of dollars. It would save time, but most importantly it could actually save lives,” said Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams.

The legislation would also authorize the city housing authority to use drones for its building inspections.

The proposal’s goal is to detect problems and possibly hazardous conditions.

Tishman was walking along 49th Street last Tuesday when a piece of facade came crashing down from a building that had been fined back in April.

City Councilmen Justin Brannan and Robert Cornegy said lawmakers must act because drone use currently is only legal inside state parks.

They point to the lack of manpower at the buildings department to keep up with the thousands of structures that have violations, or in need of repair.

“In speaking to them very recently, one of their ideas is that we’re going to add more inspectors. That’s only one part of this and only one component to what’s necessary,” said Cornegy.

The proposal would authorize private companies to offer the inspection services to building owners who would have to pay the bill — a more cost-effective option, according to the Brooklyn borough president.

City officials say the current laws regulating airspace date back to 1948, long before this drone technology existed. They’re hoping to ease those laws, get them up in the air, and inspect city buildings as soon as possible.

Similar Cases

A maintenance company which admitted breaching health and safety laws after Tahnie Martin was killed by debris blown off a roof by Storm Doris was subsequently fined £1.3 million.

Tahnie Martin, who worked at the University of Wolverhampton, died on February 23 2017 after she was struck by wooden debris while walking past a cafe in Wolverhampton city centre.

The 29-year-old, from Stafford, was walking along Dudley Street with colleagues when a large piece of roofing flew from a building.

Mother-of-two killed by stone gargoyle that fell three stories off historic church in Chicago.

Sara Bean, 34, was walking to lunch with her fiancé when she was hit in the head by the falling stone

The mother of two was rushed to the hospital where she was pronounced dead.

In May last year the RICS published an insight paper ‘Drones: applications and compliance for surveyors’ providing guidance on the issues relating to varied uses UAVs or unmannned aerial systems (UASs).

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Drones Taking off in the Claims Process?

At a glance

  • The use of drones in commercial business is increasing
  • Whilst there are numerous risks and safety concerns associated with the use of drones, they do allow for a more efficient way for businesses to survey
  • We take a look at how drones could be used during a claims process, and the benefits they could bring to the insurance industry.

The use of drones in commercial businesses is increasing, as the number of commercial operators with a license to fly drones in the UK has risen from five in 2010 to over 4,500 in 2018.

Whilst there are numerous risks and safety concerns associated with the use of drones, not least the high profile case of drones grounding flights at Gatwick, in 2018 the speed, cost and sustainability of doing so can allow for a more efficient way for businesses to survey both vast areas and hard to reach places.

We take a look at how drones could be used during a claims process, and the benefits they could bring to the insurance industry.

Surveying a damaged area

A key use of drones is their ability to survey a large area in a short time. In cases of severe damage, for example a large scale fire at a warehouse or building, or damage from extreme weather events and natural disasters, drones are able to scan the area quickly in order to determine the damage caused. Recently, drones have been able to capture images of the damage caused by wildfires in California and across parts of Australia.

In addition, another common use of drones would be to inspect damaged roofs or tall buildings, areas which would be difficult, and costly, for individuals to reach. In doing this, images of damaged areas can be accessed quicker by an insurer, meaning progress of a claim can be much quicker.

While the ability to identify large-scale damage is one benefit of using drones, it is also in cases where damage is known to exist but in places humans can’t access easily, for example equipment breakdown such as boilers that drones also have benefits. With some equipment often being located in tight places, drones can be called upon to access and survey any potential damage that may occur, or may have occurred.

Helping with inspections

Similarly to surveying a damaged area, drones can also be used in the safety inspection of a number of ways. Inspecting roofs, buildings or large areas such as crops and hard to reach equipment are just a small number of ways that drones can provide benefits to insurers before any loss has occurred.

An advantage to being able to take so many high-quality pictures of an area at once for insurers is clear – not only will it reduce the time it takes for images to be taken, but it also presents significantly less risk than if an employed surveyor attempted to take them.

An added benefit of being able to take so many images of an area during inspection, is being able to revisit those pictures when a claim is made, especially in cases of suspected fraud. For example, being able to look back at a picture of a roof that has been claimed to have been damaged in strong winds, can help detect and deter fraudulent claims if there was already damage to a particular area.

As well as reducing cost and risk for an insurer, and in an age of speed and autonomy, being able to access images of damaged areas quickly through use of a drone can lead to claims being processed faster – leading to increased customer satisfaction.

The use of drones in insurance is increasing and there has been a shift in how companies are using technology to improve their processes. As mentioned in Insurance Journal, ‘the last two years suggests that drones and aerial-imagery will soon become commonplace after catastrophes, as well as in other areas for the insurance industry’.

Whilst the benefits of using drones in the insurance industry are clear to see, there are a number of issues that will need to be resolved before their use becomes mainstream. Regulations around their use, including how big they can be, the speed they can fly and the altitudes they can go, continue to be stumbling blocks, as well as the certification and training required to be able to use one proficiently. Cost is another issue, as high quality equipment is likely to cost siginificant money, and that is before the additional outlays on staff training, qualifications and transportation.

The benefits and risks of using drones for businesses are clear, and as mentioned previously there are a number of considerations business need to make in order for them to become commonplace.

Within the claims process, drones can provide insurers with a tool to settle claims quickly and to reduce risk for claims inspectors, meaning it is surely only a matter of time until their use becomes customary.

Article by: Paul Redington Regional Major Loss Manager at Zurich Insurance Company Ltd

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Iprosurv Secures place on £8 million Government Framework Agreement

Iprosurv has again established itself as one of the UK leading supplier of drone services, with the successful award of a place in the £8m contract in conjunction with YPO and the Home Office national framework agreement.

Iprosurv tendered for one part of a four-lot contract to deliver drone services through their nationwide platform of CAA approved drone operators and associated services to the public sector organisations, in particular the blue light organisations and the emergency services, the contract runs for 2 years until 2022 with a further option to extend for a further 2 years until 2024.

Iprosurv will be on the YPO government framework agreement delivering a fully managed inspection service, along with bespoke services including immediate response for blue light services wishing to deploy drone technology where they have no or limited in house capability.

The award of the contract is testament to the continued success of Iprosurv and platform of dedicated professional pilots, in conjunction with flight safety and client service at its core.

Iprosurv attended the Bank Building – Belfast, Northern Ireland

Rebecca Jones CEO of Iprosurv commented, “We are extremely proud to have been awarded a national framework agreement with YPO, in conjunction with the Home Office, to provide associated services. Throughout 2019 we have supported over 50 organisations where they have no or limited in house capability. Increasingly we have seen deployment for major incidents on the rise through our existing partnerships in instances such as fire and floods and its not an uncommon for Iprosurv to assist the emergency services with vital aerial data insights whilst the pilot teams have been on site. Its evident drones are becoming a vital tool to collect fast and accurate data whilst improving public safety. To further support both the blue light and emergency services along with the wider public sector is a testament of our award-winning service and demonstrates our niche and bespoke solution of deployment capability is encouraging wider use of safe drone deployment”.  

Iprosurv attended Toddbrook reservoir

Explaining the reasons behind the drone framework, a YPO spokesman said: “We were approached by the Home Office to discuss a gap in public procurement. Explaining the reasons behind the drone framework, a YPO spokesman said: “We were approached by the Home Office to discuss a gap in public procurement.

“Naturally we are very excited to be working with the Home Office and on a framework that incorporates drone technology, but we are also really pleased to be working closely with the police and fire and rescue teams.”

They concluded: “After much discussion and healthy deliberation, a lot structure was agreed, believed to be fit for purpose for all public-sector organisations, not just police and fire.

“The group involved in creating the framework has a wide knowledge base. This, coupled with different personal requirements, is what will make the framework a benefit to emergency services and the wider public sector.

This follows a recent further award and a place of two lots out of a three part lot of a £1.1m framework agreement – drone services, data modelling to local authorities and housing associations. 

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2020 could be the year that drones take off

Guest blog by Scott Petty, Chief Technology Officer, UK at Vodafone

As 2020 begins, thoughts inevitably drift towards what the year ahead holds. For many of us that means well-meaning new year’s resolutions, but technology experts are once again seeking to pinpoint emerging trends and over the next 12 months, we could see the most transformative technology taking shape in the skies above us.

There are huge potential benefits to be had from emerging drone technology and if we get it right, we could soon have drones delivering medical supplies to people in our most congested cities and harder to reach communities. Drones can also monitor and respond to traffic accidents, track animals, monitor crops, watch for poachers and provide aid when natural disasters strike. The potential benefits are huge.

All of this explains why the global civil aerial drone market is expected to almost triple over the coming decade, to £11.4bn in 2028. But to make the most of the new technology in the UK, we first need to deal with questions and concerns about irresponsible and illegal drone usage.

Most drones are currently controlled via hand-held radio transmitter with flights restricted to the radius of radio signal reception, meaning that they have to fly within visual line of sight of the pilot. But as Vodafone argues in our new report to be published next week, there are huge gains to be had from drones that are able to fly safely ‘beyond visual line of sight’; something that is possible via the safer and more secure alternative of cellular-connected drones with an inbuilt SIM card connecting them to a mobile network.

Only with a cellular connected drone is it possible to track and control the device so that it can be flown safely and securely from some distance away. Cellular connection can provide further benefits as a complementary system for verifying location and the ability to have dynamic no-fly zones which can provide significant security benefits.

Understandably, it is this type of drone use that the public wants to see more of. While rogue operators have previously attracted negative headlines from incidents such as at Gatwick Airport in 2018, polling shows that the vast majority of the public would support the more widespread adoption of drones if there was a mechanism to provide increased safety, security and monitoring. For example, 92% of people support drone use for tacking fires and natural disaster relief.

To ensure the UK moves in the right direction on drones, the Government should recognise and analyse the substantial benefits that can come from cellular-connected drone use. It is only by pushing forward with the development of these drones that the UK can fully benefit from the use of the new technology, whilst ensuring they are flown safely and securely.

Across the world, organisations are waking up to the benefits of responsible drone usage. Here in the UK, the London Fire Brigade has been trialling the use of drones to improve safety for their firefighters and to allow more accurate responses to incidents. Firefighters also used drones to tackle the giant blazes during Paris’s recent Notre Dame cathedral fire. By doing so, they were able to make tactical choices to stop the fire at the time when it was potentially occupying the two belfries of the cathedral.

Further afield, drones fitted with high definition thermal cameras are increasingly used to track, inspect and monitor livestock remotely. The government of Assam in India partnered with Tata Consulting Services to use drones to conduct surveillance, identify unauthorized settlements and deter poachers in Kaziranga National Park. With drones spread over 480 square kilometres, they can now identify poachers from their heat signatures even if they are hiding in thick foliage. Already, this effort has proved beneficial for the vulnerable one-horned rhino.

If we get it right, then it is not just our emergency services and endangered species that will benefit. The economic prize for the UK could also be enormous. By 2030, it is estimated that there will be 76,000 drones in the skies above the UK and 628,000 jobs in the UK drones economy. Drones are also expected to contribute to considerable GDP uplifts in many industries, including £8.6bn in construction and manufacturing, £7.7bn in wholesale, retail trade and food services and £11.4bn in the public sector.

All the signs are that, in the next few years, responsible use of drones is set to bring huge gains for the economy and society. The UK is ready to reap the benefits of cellular-connected drones technology and if we do then 2020 could be the year that drone technology truly takes off.

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Drones can add value to Risk Management programmes.

For most people, their home is their biggest asset, but let’s say you are business owner – would it be fair to say that the business is your biggest asset. When we say asset we mean of course it’s people, it’s buildings, it’s machinery and it’s stock. Progressive use of drone technology means it is now much easier to ensure all aspects of risk to any asset of any business are improved. To put it more simply drones can protect people and businesses. 

We look at an example below where drone imagery played part of a larger customer proposition providing greater insights for the broker, customer and insurer tailoring a policy around the customers requirements and assisting with an inherent building defect which, once identified and rectified led to an improved underwriting risk. 

Aston Lark Case Study: Risk Management – Aerial Drone Survey

A book printing client in Suffolk has grown dramatically over the past 150 years, having grown from a single building to an array of buildings covering a 600,000 sq ft area. The buildings have been constructed without access to roof spaces and therefore inspecting the condition of their roofs and guttering was extremely difficult and dangerous.

Aston Lark carried out an aerial survey using the latest drone technology. We were able to offer our Client a close-range inspection of their roof and other areas of their buildings not easily visible or accessible from the ground. 

Watch the video to see how we work closely with our clients to manage risk.  

Following the aerial survey, we provided the client with high-definition quality footage and stills which are presented in a 3D interactive tool.  This enables the Client to view the entirety of their building and zoom in on areas of concern to within a foot. This ultimately enabled our Client to identify areas of concern and take remedial action before it caused further problems and cost.

To find out more about Aston Lark’s Risk Management offering and how it can benefit you, click here.

Iprosurv are the UK’s leading drone pilot supply chain facilitating deployment to insurers and related sectors.

Find out more how Iprosurv can assist your business with ongoing property management, risk consulting or claims adjusting. www.iprosurv.com

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Drones Are Revolutionizing Agriculture

Drones aren’t new technology by any means. Now, however, thanks to new software and better understanding by industries-it seems their time has now arrived.

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)—better known as drones—have been used commercially since the early 1980s. Today, however, practical applications for drones are expanding faster than ever in a variety of industries, thanks to robust investments and the relaxing of some regulations governing their use. Responding to the rapidly evolving technology, companies are creating new business and operating models for UAVs. 

The total addressable value of drone-powered solutions in all applicable industries is significant—more than $127 billion, according to a recent PwC analysis. Among the most promising areas is agriculture, where drones offer the potential for addressing several major challenges. With the world’s population projected to reach 9 billion people by 2050, experts expect agricultural consumption to increase by nearly 70 percent over the same time period. In addition, extreme weather events are on the rise, creating additional obstacles to productivity.

Agricultural producers must embrace revolutionary strategies for producing food, increasing productivity, and making sustainability a priority. Drones are part of the solution, along with closer collaboration between governments, technology leaders, and industry.

Use Cases for Agricultural Drones

Drone technology will give the agriculture industry a high-technology makeover, with planning and strategy based on real-time data gathering and processing. PwC estimates the market for drone-powered solutions in agriculture at $32.4 billion. Following are six ways aerial and ground-based drones will be used throughout the crop cycle:

1. Soil and field analysis: Drones can be instrumental at the start of the crop cycle. They produce precise 3-D maps for early soil analysis, useful in planning seed planting patterns. After planting, drone-driven soil analysis provides data for irrigation and nitrogen-level management.

2. Planting: Startups have created drone-planting systems that achieve an uptake rate of 75 percent and decrease planting costs by 85 percent. These systems shoot pods with seeds and plant nutrients into the soil, providing the plant all the nutrients necessary to sustain life.

3. Crop spraying: Distance-measuring equipment—ultrasonic echoing and lasers such as those used in the light-detection and ranging, or LiDAR, method—enables a drone to adjust altitude as the topography and geography vary, and thus avoid collisions. Consequently, drones can scan the ground and spray the correct amount of liquid, modulating distance from the ground and spraying in real time for even coverage. The result: increased efficiency with a reduction of in the amount of chemicals penetrating into groundwater. In fact, experts estimate that aerial spraying can be completed up to five times faster with drones than with traditional machinery.

4. Crop monitoring: Vast fields and low efficiency in crop monitoring together create farming’s largest obstacle. Monitoring challenges are exacerbated by increasingly unpredictable weather conditions, which drive risk and field maintenance costs. Previously, satellite imagery offered the most advanced form of monitoring. But there were drawbacks. Images had to be ordered in advance, could be taken only once a day, and were imprecise. Further, services were extremely costly and the images’ quality typically suffered on certain days. Today, time-series animations can show the precise development of a crop and reveal production inefficiencies, enabling better crop management.

5. Irrigation: Drones with hyper-spectral, multi-spectral, or thermal sensors can identify which parts of a field are dry or need improvements. Additionally, once the crop is growing, drones allow the calculation of the vegetation index, which describes the relative density and health of the crop, and show the heat signature, the amount of energy or heat the crop emits.

6. Health assessment: It’s essential to assess crop health and spot bacterial or fungal infections on trees. By scanning a crop using both visible and near-infrared light, drone-carried devices can identify which plants reflect different amounts of green light and NIR light. This information can produce multispectral images that track changes in plants and indicate their health. A speedy response can save an entire orchard. In addition, as soon as a sickness is discovered, farmers can apply and monitor remedies more precisely. These two possibilities increase a plant’s ability to overcome disease. And in the case of crop failure, the farmer will be able to document losses more efficiently for insurance claims.

Credits PwC analysis

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To Drone or Not to Drone

Gregor Paton ACII
Major Regional Loss Property Claims Manager
(London Market)

It would not be a huge stretch to say drones have taken a fair bit of negative press in the last couple of years. Even a casual news reader would have read at least one incident involving a near-miss between an aircraft and an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), with the most obvious example being the closure of Gatwick airport for nearly 2 days following reports and sightings of drones near the runway. This incident alone affected 140,000 passengers and circa 1,000 flights costing over £50m to the airport, airlines and various components of the supply chain.

Jonathan Jones
Major Regional Loss Property Claims Manager
(London Market)

But are drones bad? Are they just an expensive toy? Or can they deliver tangible benefit in specific scenarios and industries?

In this article, Jonathan Jones and Greg Paton discuss how and why the insurance industry has adopted the use of drones for claims adjustment, the benefits to the industry and the customer and scenarios in which Zurich are deploying drones following a loss.

The use of drones in general is nothing new, the emergency and armed services have been using drones for decades, and the use of underwater drones or Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) have been pioneered for even longer than that.

So, you may ask, what is all the fuss about drones in the insurance industry? The benefit of utilising drone technology, especially coupled with high definition camera’s, enables insurers to look at risks when assessing exposure prior to inception, on ongoing risk engineering evaluations, and of course post loss incidents in the claims environment. The benefit also stretches to the assessment for wide area damage such as flooding, storms and civil disturbance.

The importance of choosing a reputable partner is highly important to Zurich”

The use of drones has significant benefits for insurers in resource efficiency, which ultimately reduces costs to the industry and the customer. Instead of a costly site visit, involving multiple parties and the expenses associated with this, a post-loss drone survey can take high definition videos and pictures giving parties a vivid picture of the loss in question. These images and videos can be used by loss adjusters and claims professionals to evaluate coverage and make interim payments in a much quicker fashion. At Zurich, we have made substantial interim payments to customers within a few days of a loss based on the extent of damage seen on the drone survey and in accordance with our Claims commitment.

Zurich have recently teamed up with a company specialising in drone flight, Iprosurv

It is not only the original drone footage that is of assistance, given it provides a unique perspective on the extent of damage, it also allows for accurate measurements to be taken, and 3D modelling to be performed at the same time.

In addition where a building or site is inaccessible, due to there being a dangerous structure or contamination, then the deployment of a “disposable” lower cost drone can be agreed, in the event that there is a danger that the drone might be lost, or indeed contaminated beyond economic restoration.

Zurich have recently teamed up with a company specialising in drone flight, Iprosurv, and we have agreed stringent service level agreements, to ensure we can be on site and filming footage in the early stages of the incident, and the drones can help with cause and origin investigations. Since partnering with iprosurv 12 months ago, the Major Loss Team have utilised their services 11 times on claims with a combined estimate of £143.5 million. The nature of these losses range from shopping centres, schools through to social housing fires.

With the average cost of a drone survey in the order of GBP1,500.00 there are clear financial benefits, with the customer engagement opportunities, to showcase, an intangible bonus. The importance of choosing a reputable partner is highly important to Zurich. Whilst drones are fairly new to insurers, they are subject to high regulation within the UK and, part of a consequence of the Gatwick incident, will continue to have the spotlight when it comes to further regulation. Commercial drone operators must obtain a license in order to operate and profit from flying a drone. The risk of injury or damage to a third party or third party property must also be considered, highlighting the importance of choosing a professional outfit when undertaking these surveys.

As of November 2019, all drone operators must undertake a compulsory online test to show they have knowledge and practical understanding of the current regulations and are fit to operate drones in an external environment.

The full article and other news from the Zurich Claims Quarterly Journal 2019 can be found here https://insider.zurich.co.uk/claims/zurich-claims-quarterly-journal-winter-2019/

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Insurance Companies Continue to Embrace Drone Technology…But we have so much more to offer!

The insurance industry is continuing to embrace drone technology, but commercial drone operators such as Iprosurv still have so much more to offer our clients and continue to assist and educate our clients on the  benefits of drones, including better safety, efficiency, faster turnaround time, and reduced costs. Goldman Sachs estimates the global drone industry to reach $100 billion by 2020. Given that insurers today are struggling with an increasing amount of damage from natural disasters and fraud, plenty of insurance companies are aspiring to be data-driven organizations. PwC reported that drone technology could help the insurance industry save as much as 6.8 billion USD annually. 

Insurance companies are already turning to commercial drone companies. Drones can play a part in all the stages of the insurance lifecycle, especially claims management and fraud prevention. Drone powered solutions also help with real-time insights, risk monitoring, and assessment, as well as improving customer experience during claims and surge events.

Risk Assessment

Drones can be used to gather data before a risk is insured, to help in preventative maintenance, and to assess damage after an event. They also allow insurers to engage a generalist, rather than a specialist, to perform field assessments and obtain high-quality visuals. The insurer can achieve significant cost savings through improved efficiency, generating the ROI for investing in drones. Insurers are increasingly using drones for property assessments. Used in the Risk environment drones can help policy holder and insurer formulate a maintenance program over the term of the policy or prior to insurance inception.

Accelerate Claim Management

Insurance companies can assess damage quicker and more efficiently with drone operations by eliminating the need for multiple site visits. For example, a drone can help a claims adjuster process three houses in an hour, whereas without one, an adjuster could process only about three houses in a day (Farmers Insurance). Drones can increase inspection efficiency by up to 85%.

Data Touch Points

When a claim occurs, it can involve multiple stakeholders, Loss Adjusters, Insurers, Forensics, Structural Engineers, Emergency Services, Local Authorities each one requiring instant visual data to make key decisions in the progression of the claim or incident, large amounts of data can be obtained by the use of drone technology, but the use cases don’t stop there, through the use of advanced analytics and software’s stakeholders can receive the data in multiple use formats from basic photogrammetry, 3D modelling, BIMM models. Each stakeholder may use the same data set in a different way dependent on the information they require.

Fraud Reduction

Drones can particularly play a significant role while settling agricultural insurances, as they assess the actual yield and cultivable land. A drone can gather data on 500 to 1,000 acres in less than a day, thereby reducing the time it takes to settle claims- from days to hours. Using drones, Drones have been able to survey three times as many acres as an adjuster on foot and efficiently account for all of a customer’s crop damage.

Improving Customer Experience During Catastrophes

Inclement weather and challenging to reach locations, make it cumbersome for insurers to reach, which eventually results in delay and failure to resolve a large number of claims in a given time. Storms and floods make up large percentage of insured losses. As seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, 300 high-rise buildings were inspected by GFA Generali insurance using drones. The process took just ten days, whereas a ground crew of the same size would have taken several months.

Employee Safety

When appraising property claims, claim adjusters typically encounter hazardous situations. Drone-mapping is a safer inspection method. Companies like Iprosurv are making drone roof inspection more efficient and safer by reducing their exposure to accidents and hazardous conditions. With the implementation of Iprosurvs Major Loss package insurers, loss adjusters, forensics, structural engineers and local authorities to name but a few can have access to vital data to asses interim payments and scope of works all this can be done without attending the initial site visit when the structure is deemed unsafe to enter or the site is under a strict health and safety cordon due to the possibility of collapse or injury to personel.

Bespoke Online Portal.

 Utilizing state of the art software and technology we are able to deliver large amounts of data in user friendly interfaces. With the addition of Iprosurv bespoke portal we are able to deliver large amounts of data in a safe compliant environment with multiple stakeholders. The system is setup to be an end to end system for our clients with multiple touchpoints built in.

If you would like to know more about Iprosurv please do not hesitate to get in touch with us by visiting our website at www.iprosurv.com.

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https://iprosurv.com/2020/02/05/drones-could-form-key-part-of-next-generation-of-uk-search-and-rescue/Drones could form key part of next generation of UK search and rescue

https://iprosurv.com/2020/02/03/falling-debris-prompts-push-for-drone-inspections/Falling Debris prompts push for drone inspections.

https://iprosurv.com/2020/01/28/drones-taking-off-in-the-claims-process/Drones Taking off in the Claims Process?

https://iprosurv.com/2020/01/24/iprosurv-secures-place-on-8-million-government-framework-agreement/Iprosurv Secures place on £8 million Government Framework Agreement

https://iprosurv.com/2020/01/22/2020-could-be-the-year-that-drones-take-off/2020 could be the year that drones take off

https://iprosurv.com/2020/01/07/case-study-risk-management-aerial-drone-survey/Drones can add value to Risk Management programmes.

https://iprosurv.com/2020/01/02/drones-are-revolutionizing-agriculture/Drones Are Revolutionizing Agriculture

https://iprosurv.com/2019/12/20/to-drone-or-not-to-drone/To Drone or Not to Drone

https://iprosurv.com/2019/12/09/insurance-companies-continue-to-embrace-drone-technology-but-we-have-so-much-more-to-offer/Insurance Companies Continue to Embrace Drone Technology…But we have so much more to offer!