Wherever the economy goes, drones will lead the way

Wherever the economy goes, drones will lead the way

Such is the flexibility of commercial drones, they are being adopted in more sectors and in more ways than ever before. So much so that it can be hard to keep track of all the applications, so we asked our friends at Coptrz, experts in commercial drone technology, to give us their view on the most important and exciting applications of drone today.

The drone market is set to grow steadily in the consumer, commercial and public safety sectors over the next few years. In many business practices, drones can substitute traditional methods of operation. For example, the inspection industry is benefiting greatly from the use of drone technology.

Thanks to their ever-improving accuracy, greater efficiency, cost savings and enhanced safety features, drones are changing the way that companies around the world perform inspections. In fact, the drone inspection market continues to grow as technology enables more and more applications.

George Burne, Business Development Manager for the Inspection Industry at Coptrz, commented: “The UK inspection industry, like all industries is a constantly evolving market which has welcomed the use of new technology such as UAVs with open arms. What is great about the use of drone technology is it allows business owners to deliver high quality data while near eliminating risk to any of their crew members. Be this internal or external, choosing to put a robot at height or into a confined space is always the best decision.”

George Burne Business Development Manager Coptrz

Inspections, Surveying, Health and Safety, Reducing Risk

Drones are transforming industrial inspections in critical infrastructure. Using drones for inspection allows for efficient inspections at speed where you can acquire high-quality data from dangerous environments. The benefits to organisations of using drones for inspection included reduced risk to workers, cost savings and reduced downtime. Utilising a drone to undertake a visual inspection uses the drone’s camera quite simply to act as the inspector’s eyes.

Along with the inspection industry, the surveying sector has seen a vast improvement on the accuracy of data collected when using drones. The drone survey market continues to grow as technology enables applications such as 3D modelling, site progress and site inspections. The use of drones can significantly reduce the costs of both equipment and labour in medium to large surveys. In most cases, a single drone survey will only require one qualified pilot. Time on site for data capture can be increased up to 80%. The data captured can be used for multiple applications.

Drones can provide the same data output as traditional surveys, but in a fraction of the time. A job that would once take multiple days can now be done in a matter of hours, without compromising on data output. After a quick data process before leaving the site, a surveyor can perform the necessary processing with the knowledge that no data has been missed.

Drones are also revolutionising the police and public safety sectors. Unmanned aircrafts have become a force multiplier for law enforcement teams, providing unprecedented views of a scene or incident – helping to fight crime, plan an effective response and keep officers safe. Police are deploying drones and sophisticated payloads, including zoom and thermal cameras, for a range of thermal missions such as search and rescue, crowd control, evidence-gathering and accident reconstruction.

Agriculture

The use of drones in the agriculture industry is steadily growing along with other industries. Drones are being used in agriculture as part of an effective approach to sustainable agricultural management that allows farmers to help streamline their operations, using data analytics to gain effective insights into their crops. UAVs are particularly useful for the careful monitoring of large areas of farmland, considering factors such as slope and elevation. The technology has also proven useful in gaining an extensive overview of plan emergence and population, as more accurate data can help with replanting decisions, as well as thinning and pruning activity.

Jamie Cording, UAV Strategist at Coptrz commented: “Agriculture is arguably the most exciting area of the UK drone industry right now. With the release of the DJI Phantom 4 Multispectral not so long ago, we felt real strides being taken in terms of research, data and analysis in the field. There’s no stopping where this sector of the industry can go when we look at other parts of the world. The UK agriculture sector is still very young compared to other areas that are using drones, but there is so much that a drone can be used for within this market that makes it so fruitful. There is huge opportunity to revolutionise processes using drones in agriculture.”

Jamie Cording UAV Strategist coptrz

The drone industry is still in the infancy stage in terms of mass adoption and usage, but drones have already broken through rigid traditional barriers in industries which otherwise seemed impenetrable by similar technological innovations. The likes of Royal Mail are piloting the delivery of packages and letters using drones – the possibility for what the technology can do is endless.

Construction

It is said that the construction sector will be the largest commercial buyer of UAVs. Although drones are being actively used in the architecture and construction industry today, business application of drone technology in construction is increasing. The cameras and sensors that can be attached to drones mean that they can make a digital model of real objects from multiple angles that allow a computer to create an accurate 3D model. This building information modelling helps prevent construction mistakes and distribute resources effectively. Flying drones above construction sites can allow for high-definition surveys before projects start, tracking of progress and better management of processes.

There is without a doubt a place for drones in the modern digital world. Today, you can see drones inspecting, surveying and monitoring. The business applications of drone technology is growing thanks to the benefits that the technology brings.

Posted in Drone Tech, General Interest, Information, Iprosurv News

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Falling Debris prompts push for drone inspections.

Fatal falling debris accident prompts push for drone inspections

By Amy Yensi

Just days after Erica Tishman, a renowned architect, was killed by falling debris in midtown, some city officials are proposing a new law they say will help prevent similar accidents.

It would require the department of buildings to conduct a drone inspection within 48 hours of a complaint or violation.

“This is not a toy, but it’s a tool. These tools will save millions of dollars. It would save time, but most importantly it could actually save lives,” said Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams.

The legislation would also authorize the city housing authority to use drones for its building inspections.

The proposal’s goal is to detect problems and possibly hazardous conditions.

Tishman was walking along 49th Street last Tuesday when a piece of facade came crashing down from a building that had been fined back in April.

City Councilmen Justin Brannan and Robert Cornegy said lawmakers must act because drone use currently is only legal inside state parks.

They point to the lack of manpower at the buildings department to keep up with the thousands of structures that have violations, or in need of repair.

“In speaking to them very recently, one of their ideas is that we’re going to add more inspectors. That’s only one part of this and only one component to what’s necessary,” said Cornegy.

The proposal would authorize private companies to offer the inspection services to building owners who would have to pay the bill — a more cost-effective option, according to the Brooklyn borough president.

City officials say the current laws regulating airspace date back to 1948, long before this drone technology existed. They’re hoping to ease those laws, get them up in the air, and inspect city buildings as soon as possible.

Similar Cases

A maintenance company which admitted breaching health and safety laws after Tahnie Martin was killed by debris blown off a roof by Storm Doris was subsequently fined £1.3 million.

Tahnie Martin, who worked at the University of Wolverhampton, died on February 23 2017 after she was struck by wooden debris while walking past a cafe in Wolverhampton city centre.

The 29-year-old, from Stafford, was walking along Dudley Street with colleagues when a large piece of roofing flew from a building.

Mother-of-two killed by stone gargoyle that fell three stories off historic church in Chicago.

Sara Bean, 34, was walking to lunch with her fiancé when she was hit in the head by the falling stone

The mother of two was rushed to the hospital where she was pronounced dead.

In May last year the RICS published an insight paper ‘Drones: applications and compliance for surveyors’ providing guidance on the issues relating to varied uses UAVs or unmannned aerial systems (UASs).

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https://iprosurv.com/2021/05/24/wherever-the-economy-goes-drones-will-lead-the-way/Wherever the economy goes, drones will lead the way

https://iprosurv.com/2020/02/03/falling-debris-prompts-push-for-drone-inspections/Falling Debris prompts push for drone inspections.